Welcome to Spling Movies

Welcome to Spling Movies

Facebook  Twitter
Custom Search
Movie News
3 Gambling Films You've Probably Never Seen


Las Vegas and Hollywood are almost synonymous when it comes to fancy suits, flash, boulevards and big lights - making films about casinos and nightlife a perfect fit with the glitz and glam of Tinseltown. It’s not surprising that almost everyone has heard about films like Casino Royale, Casino, 21, Ocean's Eleven and The Gambler.

When it comes to drama, what better way can you leverage high stakes plots than by putting characters in situations where they can literally change their lives overnight. They’ve got the limelight sure, but what about the gambling films that slip between the cracks? Here are three films you may not have heard of, which are with watching if you enjoy the genre.

Hard Eight

Hard Eight (1996)


This is neo-noir crime thriller is a feature film debut for Paul Thomas Anderson, who is best known for There Will Be Blood, Punch Drunk Love, Inherent Vice and Boogie Nights. The film stars some big names in Philip Baker Hall, John C. Riley, Gwyneth Paltrow and Samuel L Jackson. The plot centres around a professional gambler named Sydney who finds a lost soul in John, a young man, sitting outside a diner. After making his acquaintance, he soon discovers John has to pay $6,000 for his mother's funeral.

He offers to take John to Las Vegas and teach him how to make money for a living by gambling. The two grow closer as John becomes a protégé but complications arise over several years of friendship as John falls for Clementine. Compelling characters, understated performances and true originality underpin this moody drama. Hard Eight serves as one of the acclaimed director's first films.

Owning Mahowny (2003)


This Canadian drama directed by Richard Kwietniowski stars Philip Seymour Hoffman, Minnie Driver and John Hurt, based on a novel and Canada’s largest one-man bank fraud. The gambling drama follows a Toronto bank employee Dan Mahowny, played by Seymour Hoffman, who rises up within the bank getting access to bigger and bigger accounts - soon gaining access to millions of dollars.

Unbeknownst to his colleagues, he makes weekly trips to Atlantic City, where he uses money he’s skimmed to gamble. Treated like royalty by the casino manager, his undercover dealings soon catch up with him. This character study centres around Mahowny, his relationship with Belinda and leans on an incredible turn from Philip Seymour Hoffman whose unkempt and earnest performance as an unhinged bank clerk drives this film set in the 1980s.

Even Money (2006)


Even Money follows the story of three complete strangers: Carolyn - a published author, Walter - a has-been magician and Clyde - a man in deep debt, whose lives intertwine in the world of gambling. The film stars Kim Basinger, Danny DeVito, Forest Whitaker, Ray Liotta and Kelsey Grammer, rounding off a sharp cast under the direction of Mark Rydell (On Golden Pond, The Long Goodbye).

Tense, tightly scripted, this independent crime drama gives you a strong dose of reality offering an ensemble drama with the same ambitions as Traffic, Syriana and Crash. A modern film noir we flit between each of the character's scenarios as the drama intensifies.


 
Casinos in Pop Culture


Casinos have been around for hundreds of years, so it should come as no surprise that over time they have made their way into pop culture. After all, when you think about the thrill of the games, the glitz and glamor, and the crazy lifestyle often associated with Las Vegas, casinos have plenty to offer creators.

Casinos have been featured in everything from movies to books, TV shows, and even video games. It’s not just land-based casinos that have been featured; these days online casinos are also being celebrated in pop culture.

We take a look at some of the best examples of casinos in pop culture over the years.

Casinos in movies

There are so many casino movies out there that it would be difficult to name them all. From modern classics such as Casino Royale to popular heist flicks such as the Ocean’s Eleven franchise, these movies all feature gambling venues that make for an excellent setting, as well as often being central to the storyline.

Some of our favorite examples of casino movies out there include Casino, 21, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Back to the Future 2, Rounders, Rain Man, The Hangover, Swingers, and Croupier. As for those featuring online casinos, they’re a bit rarer. One example is the 2013 movie Runner Runner, starring Ben Affleck, although it didn’t get great reviews. It would be interesting to see if any hits based on online casinos come out anytime soon.

Casinos in TV shows

There are several instances where casinos have featured on popular TV shows. Think Friends, when they all go to visit Joey who is working at a casino or that episode of The Simpsons when Homer takes Ned to Sin City to show him “the right way to live.”

What some of you may not realize, however, is that there are also a few TV shows out there that were actually centered around gambling and casinos. Most notably, these include Las Vegas, which ran back in the early 2000s and focused on a former CIA agent and casino boss played by actor James Caan, and The Casino, which was a reality TV series that offered viewers an insight into the realities of running a casino.

Casinos in literature

Some of the casino movies we mentioned before are based on popular books. These include Hunter S. Thompson’s Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Ben Mezrich’s 21: Bringing Down the House: How Six Students Took Vegas for Millions and Ian Fleming’s Casino Royale. However, these are not the only examples of casinos in literature.

Of course, there are several books written on gambling and casinos, but many of these discuss the principles of the games and offer advice on how you can beat the house. Other interesting reads include Don’t Look Twice, The Eudaemonic Pie, and Straight Flush, which is based on the true story of a bunch of frat boys who start one of the biggest online poker sites.

Casinos in music

Musicians have also been inspired by the thrill of gambling, writing lyrics about the ace of spades, deals with the devil, and more. This list wouldn’t be complete without hits such as Frank Sinatra’s Luck Be A Lady, Ace of Spades by Motorhead, Casino Boogie by the Rolling Stones, Viva Las Vegas by Elvis Presley, The Gambler by Kenny Rogers, Deuces Are Wild by Aerosmith, Poker Face by Lady Gaga, and Katy Perry’s Waking Up In Vegas.

Pop culture in the casino

Of course, it’s not just pop culture that draws its inspiration from casinos. It also works the other way around, with casino games taking their inspiration from popular movies, comics, TV shows, and more. Superman is just one of many examples of such inspiration.

Taking inspiration from pop culture to create hit online casino games is a great idea, as it can help to create a truly engaging and better playing experience, particularly if the player is a big fan of the movie or TV show that the game is based on. So, if you’re a casino looking to reach out to a new audience or create better games, then using pop culture may just be a great way to do so.

 
Two Acclaimed South African Films Coming Home


Die Stropers (The Harvesters) and An Act Of Defiance aka Bram Fischer, two European/South African co-productions from Spier Films, will be premiering at this year’s Silwerskerm Fees in Cape Town. Having had a successful festival run, garnering critical acclaim and scooping a number of festival awards for their exploration of the Afrikaner identity, they're coming home.

Die Stropers, directed by Etienne Kallos and starring Juliana Venter and Morne Visser, received a standing ovation at this year’s 71st Cannes Film Festival as part of the Un Certain Regard selection. The atmospheric film is set in a white, conservative, patriarchal rural community in the eastern Free State. Two stepbrothers, a teenage misfit and a hardened orphan become embroiled in a power struggle for heritage and parental love.

The Harvesters

Kallos’ screenplay won the Gan Foundation’s 'Prix opening Shot Prize’ for best screenplay at Cannes and the Mahindra ‘Global Filmmaker Award’ at Sundance before the film even went into production. Kallos says he wanted to explore adolescence and tell a story about the first generation to be born completely outside of the Apartheid system, alienated and burdened by the weight of post-colonialism.

Spier's second film, An Act of Defiance, directed by Jean van de Velde and starring Peter Paul Muller and Antoinette Louw, is a rousing historical drama and political thriller based on the real events of the pivotal 1963 Rivonia Trial. While Nelson Mandela and his compatriots face charges of conspiracy to commit sabotage and treason, white Afrikaner lawyer Bram Fischer risks everything to defend and save them from the death penalty.

An Act of Defiance - Bram Fischer

Both films "have the potential for both critical and commercial success internationally and at home while remaining dedicated to fostering South Africa’s unique talent, stories and voices", according to Spier Films chief executive, Michael Auret.

 
David Cronenberg Discusses the Death of Cinema


David Cronenberg - the critically acclaimed Canadian director behind such brilliant dramas Crash, The Fly and Existenz - told a packed audience at the Neuchatel International Fantasy Film Festival in Switzerland that the death of cinema has already arrived. The 75-year-old auteur, who was participating as part of a Masterclass at the festival, talked at length about the growing powers of streaming sites like Netflix and the troubles of working in Hollywood. Discussing his growing disillusionment with the cinema experience,  Cronenberg said: "the big screen is shattering into a million small screens” and “film-making is not dead, but cinemas are no longer the cathedral where you commune with other people.”

David Cronenberg

Viewership habits

Cronenberg's statements come amidst growing turmoil plaguing the film industry. Directors such as Steven Spielberg, Quentin Tarantino and Ridley Scott have all voiced their fears about the future decline of the art form. Whilst more and more people prefer to get their entertainment via platforms such as YouTube, Netflix and Hulu,  Cronenberg is adamant that this transformation is a positive one and should be embraced, saying, "cinema is changing, evolving as well." Netflix has become a global powerhouse in terms of its influence. Since starting out in 1997, it has gained more than 117 million subscribers across nearly every country in the world, amidst a backdrop of the lowest movie theatre attendance in the US and Canada since 1992, with 1.24 billion tickets sold in 2017.

Films like the documentary Jim and Andy, the Korean fantasy film Okja and even the Daniel Negreanu biopic, KidPoker, present a diverse portfolio of viewing and appeal to audiences who want to enjoy flicks at home instead of heading to the cinema.

On working with Netflix

Cronenberg told the audience that he has signalled his intentions of potentially working with Netflix in the future, comparing the act of working with Netflix to that of creating a novel. Of his potential endeavours with Netflix, Cronenberg said, "the cinematic equivalent of the novel is a Netflix series that goes on for maybe 5-7 years.... and that it is possible that instead of writing a novel I would do a series for Netflix." TV shows like Stranger Things, The Handmaid's Tale and Orange is the New Black have been lauded for their willingness to explore deeper character arcs and story lines over many episodes. Allowing directors like Cronenberg creative freedom on a scale not seen before.

It's also no surprise that Cronenberg might be headed to Netflix, at the very same Masterclass he openly discussed his struggles of working within Tinseltown and the system, even talking about his director friend Martin Scorsese who till this day still finds it hard to make movies in the Hollywood system.  Cronenberg's last film, 2014’s Maps To The Stars, perfectly encapsulated the director’s state of mind. A film that predated the Harvey Weinstein scandal, and presents a rather bleak vision of the industry.  Cronenberg's remarks remind us of the dramatic shift taking place in the cinema landscape, a place where for over a century billions of moviegoers would enjoy the sights and sounds of moving pictures. Now, only time will tell whether cinema will stick around or be replaced by the small screen.

 
The Age of White Noise News...


There's too much of everything. No one knows what's important anymore. It seems that nothing is important to anyone. This is the perceived "current mood" and while numbing the reality, emoticons are not going to mask the fact that the world of news and media is flailing. We're living in an age of nostalgia and confuserism where our fear of the rampant new is trying to hold the present hostage by recycling the comfortable past leaving us melancholy, disillusioned and alienated.

The internet has leveled the playing fields, making it easier than ever to get your voice heard, whether it be running a website, a blog, podcast or vlog. While the door's wide open... it's ceased to be a door. The shift from physical newspapers and books to online news and e-books has been radical, making it difficult for traditional news agencies to compete with digital and news-sharing across social media. Our confuserist society has been drawn into the get-it-while-it's-hot style of hard, fast and disposable news and media. The rise of comedic platforms like The Onion has further complicated matters, creating a glut of news ranging from fact-based to yarn. While reporting has been slanted by media company agendas since their inception, the new digital format lends itself to viral news-casting, where inflammatory and bogus news is doing the rounds. The constant buzz of insta-reporting has left us in a state of white noise news.

white noise news

While prolific, people have become weary of this wildfire reporting, which like spam has enough easy to identify earmarks to disarm and dismiss as hokum or propaganda. Still, toasting what's happening now and today has become the essence of news with in-depth Pulitzer prize-winning journalism falling to the wayside. Twitter's slogan is "What's happening now" and has shaped the culture of information gathering, preferring headline orientated news where readers only want news at a glance. The instant gratification of breaking news has made it a real-time obsession and interactive news aggregator as images, text and opinion become a live-stream of unfiltered trending content, rather than taking a more circumspect approach as has happened with news reporting in the past. Instead of waiting for the evening news or tomorrow's paper, there's a drive to get articles, video, reports and news updates to press as fast as it hits social media with many news agencies actually using social media as their guide to what's important and newsworthy.

This speedy style of reporting doesn't give journalists the time to sift through the facts, opting for catchy headlines to attract readers rather than cultivating a considered culture and strong reputation. Nowadays, reporting and reviewing is no longer considered an art form in and of itself. There's more weight on speed of delivery and less emphasis on substantial content, making it more about hooking readers and recycling content than informing or educating them. The art of the hook has become more important as digital operates on a much broader and more measurable front, making the pond an ocean and turning digital content into click bait.

There are exceptions to the rule, such as BBC, The Economist, The New York Times, The Guardian and The Wall Street Journal, although many of the esteemed reporting and opinion agencies are struggling to keep going due to sweeping changes across the digital landscape, the transition from print to online and less advertising revenue. Why pay for a newspaper when you can check your favourite online news channel for free? Moreover, news has become infotainment... making it important to turn fact into story to keep viewers transfixed. Fudging the lines has made it difficult for good journalists to stay in the game. When newspapers don't have any budget, or at least plead poverty, journalists are swayed into writing for exposure and the practice bottoms out or shifts to adjust to compensate. If you can get a reasonable report or piece for next to nothing, it's very difficult to motivate why it's necessary to pay another more seasoned or esteemed professional.

Converting to digital platforms has also meant that there's a greater emphasis on writing SEO-friendly content, marginalising the quality of the content once again. This watering down of journalism has made it a slog for freelancers who try to peddle their writing for per word rates in a culture where bullet points rule and weak writing is published without much forethought. While the nature of journalism has changed dramatically, making it seem like anyone can write... this film critic believes we're going to see a return to high quality content.

Film critics are equally challenged. In the past, newspapers were able to support a resident film critic or even team of film writers. Now, international syndication means one review can be disseminated across news channels and partners at a fraction of the cost of generating an original, homegrown review. Converting the role into a more widespread entertainment journalist means there's less chance of specialising, accommodating theatre, TV, gossip and events. Generating multi-platform content means there's less time (and money) available to focus on crafting high quality reviews. The rise of review aggregators has made it easier for film goers to simply rely on a consensus rating than a specific voice and there's such a humdrum of opinions from social media to print that it's difficult to see the critic from the crowd. Box office figures are sliding, streaming services are subverting cinema attendance and there's no longer a fixed or stable financial model for the traditional film critic.

The burgeoning tsunami of fake news, diluted and agenda-fueled insta-journalism has to crash at some point. While the online platform has certainly opened the floodgates, there's a definite feeling of apprehension and a growing desire for substance that should amount to a new readership, who want more intelligent, thoughtful reporting that goes beyond a catchy headline and makes you want to read the paper from cover-to-cover. Fake news and social media algorithims may have swayed an election and disrupted many solid reputations, but we're in a state of overload and people are feeling overwhelmed by the relentless outpouring of fast food style content. Simplification and minimalism is gradually becoming a priority in this over-saturated new digital world.

As people tend towards de-cluttering their minds and switching off the constant white noise of modern society, perhaps then it'll be time for news agencies to rethink their reporting model... opting for the kind of content and writing that builds lifelong and loyal relationships with their readers rather than opting for quick, baseless and reheated news for mass appeal. If news agencies convert their content generation from advertiser loyal to reader loyal it could become an echo chamber. What we're needing is reporting integrity crowdfunded by those who want to know what's really happening.

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 1 of 42