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Kill Buljo: The Movie
Genre Comedy
Year: 2007
 
Review:

The best way to describe Kill Buljo: The Movie would be to imagine a strange low budget mixture of Kill Bill, Austin Powers and Reno 911. Kill Buljo: The Movie is a production by Norweigan film-makers, Tommy Wirkola and Stig Frode Henriksen. The duo are comparable with Edgar Wright and Simon Pegg, since both teams share a similar love/hate relationship with Hollywood. The desire to mimic and destroy are both inherent in each team’s work as they both write and then split duties when it comes to acting and directing. However, the comparison ends here. Pegg and Wright are light years ahead of the Wirkola/Henriksen pairing. Films such as Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz have been met with acclaim from critics and fans. They manage to blend local British comedy with Hollywood movie charm. In Kill Buljo, the film seems to have lost something in its translation. The emphasis on alcohol probably stems from strict government moderation, and the discrimination against “Laps” is a parallel with Hollywood’s take on hillbillies.

Kill Buljo is a spoof of Tarantino’s Kill Bill, and its reported that Tarantino has even watched this cheap spin-off. The movie was originally intended to be a local release, but has been dubbed in English for DVD release. The storyline is the only similarity with Kill Bill as Jompa (Henriksen), a weedy “Lap” replaces Uma Thurman as The Bride. Kill Buljo: The Movie loosely mimics the trajectory of Kill Bill by including scenes as an echo of Tarantino’s masterpiece. The cast flips the girl power slant on its head, and favours men instead of women for the roles of henchmen and villains. Kill Buljo’s flavour is distinctly Norweigan and it tends to spice things up with an offensive mix of sexual humour. There are loads of references to sodomy and beastiality with a heavy emphasis on toilet humour. These perverse additions to the script slap it on thick, and the DVD cover of Jomba taking a goat from behind should give you some idea of where the movie is heading.

Jomba dons a yellow suit, fights with a samurai sword and wants to avenge his wedding crashers and their boss, Buljo. The bloody path to the top of the food chain is not as strenuous or skillful as that of The Bride. Henriksen’s physical performance is more Charlie Chaplin than Uma Thurman. The fight sequences have nothing on Kill Bill, and they tend to skip over the difficult action scenes. For instance, Uma’s bloody body count battle is totally ignored and substituted by lame off-screen gore and blood spurts leading up to the grand finale. The tone is slapstick and there are one or two funny moments. The snowmobile chase raises the bar at one stage, but it sinks back to its low brow simulation. Other references include a scene from Deliverance, a tag line from Alien and a one-liner from Star Wars. The camera work makes it feel like the whole movie was shot on two DV cameras. The script is coupled with gags and toilet humour that pay homage to the tasteless Austin Powers sequels, and the dialogue is peppered with bad language. Kill Buljo has a camp, amateur look and it frolicks in the mud as if by choice.

Kill Buljo: The Movie is the lowest form of film-making tempered by wit. Imagine Ed Wood directed American Pie. The spoof genre takes a new low as this film gets a DVD release beyond its borders. At best, you won’t gag watching this garbage, but you could just as easily find this to be the worst film you’ve ever seen. Kill Buljo may enjoy a small cult following in Norway, but it certainly won’t deliver on the same level as Napoleon Dynamite. One can admire the production for its determination on such a small budget, but setting out to spoof a cult juggernaut like Kill Bill requires more than a love for movies. These film-makers have got the drive, but will need better material and financing if they’re going to be taken seriously in the future.

The bottom line: Trash.

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