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The Age of White Noise News...


There's too much of everything. No one knows what's important anymore. It seems that nothing is important to anyone. This is the perceived "current mood" and while numbing the reality, emoticons are not going to mask the fact that the world of news and media is flailing. We're living in an age of nostalgia and confuserism where our fear of the rampant new is trying to hold the present hostage by recycling the comfortable past leaving us melancholy, disillusioned and alienated.

The internet has leveled the playing fields, making it easier than ever to get your voice heard, whether it be running a website, a blog, podcast or vlog. While the door's wide open... it's ceased to be a door. The shift from physical newspapers and books to online news and e-books has been radical, making it difficult for traditional news agencies to compete with digital and news-sharing across social media. Our confuserist society has been drawn into the get-it-while-it's-hot style of hard, fast and disposable news and media. The rise of comedic platforms like The Onion has further complicated matters, creating a glut of news ranging from fact-based to yarn. While reporting has been slanted by media company agendas since their inception, the new digital format lends itself to viral news-casting, where inflammatory and bogus news is doing the rounds. The constant buzz of insta-reporting has left us in a state of white noise news.

white noise news

While prolific, people have become weary of this wildfire reporting, which like spam has enough easy to identify earmarks to disarm and dismiss as hokum or propaganda. Still, toasting what's happening now and today has become the essence of news with in-depth Pulitzer prize-winning journalism falling to the wayside. Twitter's slogan is "What's happening now" and has shaped the culture of information gathering, preferring headline orientated news where readers only want news at a glance. The instant gratification of breaking news has made it a real-time obsession and interactive news aggregator as images, text and opinion become a live-stream of unfiltered trending content, rather than taking a more circumspect approach as has happened with news reporting in the past. Instead of waiting for the evening news or tomorrow's paper, there's a drive to get articles, video, reports and news updates to press as fast as it hits social media with many news agencies actually using social media as their guide to what's important and newsworthy.

This speedy style of reporting doesn't give journalists the time to sift through the facts, opting for catchy headlines to attract readers rather than cultivating a considered culture and strong reputation. Nowadays, reporting and reviewing is no longer considered an art form in and of itself. There's more weight on speed of delivery and less emphasis on substantial content, making it more about hooking readers and recycling content than informing or educating them. The art of the hook has become more important as digital operates on a much broader and more measurable front, making the pond an ocean and turning digital content into click bait.

There are exceptions to the rule, such as BBC, The Economist, The New York Times, The Guardian and The Wall Street Journal, although many of the esteemed reporting and opinion agencies are struggling to keep going due to sweeping changes across the digital landscape, the transition from print to online and less advertising revenue. Why pay for a newspaper when you can check your favourite online news channel for free? Moreover, news has become infotainment... making it important to turn fact into story to keep viewers transfixed. Fudging the lines has made it difficult for good journalists to stay in the game. When newspapers don't have any budget, or at least plead poverty, journalists are swayed into writing for exposure and the practice bottoms out or shifts to adjust to compensate. If you can get a reasonable report or piece for next to nothing, it's very difficult to motivate why it's necessary to pay another more seasoned or esteemed professional.

Converting to digital platforms has also meant that there's a greater emphasis on writing SEO-friendly content, marginalising the quality of the content once again. This watering down of journalism has made it a slog for freelancers who try to peddle their writing for per word rates in a culture where bullet points rule and weak writing is published without much forethought. While the nature of journalism has changed dramatically, making it seem like anyone can write... this film critic believes we're going to see a return to high quality content.

Film critics are equally challenged. In the past, newspapers were able to support a resident film critic or even team of film writers. Now, international syndication means one review can be disseminated across news channels and partners at a fraction of the cost of generating an original, homegrown review. Converting the role into a more widespread entertainment journalist means there's less chance of specialising, accommodating theatre, TV, gossip and events. Generating multi-platform content means there's less time (and money) available to focus on crafting high quality reviews. The rise of review aggregators has made it easier for film goers to simply rely on a consensus rating than a specific voice and there's such a humdrum of opinions from social media to print that it's difficult to see the critic from the crowd. Box office figures are sliding, streaming services are subverting cinema attendance and there's no longer a fixed or stable financial model for the traditional film critic.

The burgeoning tsunami of fake news, diluted and agenda-fueled insta-journalism has to crash at some point. While the online platform has certainly opened the floodgates, there's a definite feeling of apprehension and a growing desire for substance that should amount to a new readership, who want more intelligent, thoughtful reporting that goes beyond a catchy headline and makes you want to read the paper from cover-to-cover. Fake news and social media algorithims may have swayed an election and disrupted many solid reputations, but we're in a state of overload and people are feeling overwhelmed by the relentless outpouring of fast food style content. Simplification and minimalism is gradually becoming a priority in this over-saturated new digital world.

As people tend towards de-cluttering their minds and switching off the constant white noise of modern society, perhaps then it'll be time for news agencies to rethink their reporting model... opting for the kind of content and writing that builds lifelong and loyal relationships with their readers rather than opting for quick, baseless and reheated news for mass appeal. If news agencies convert their content generation from advertiser loyal to reader loyal it could become an echo chamber. What we're needing is reporting integrity crowdfunded by those who want to know what's really happening.