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Movie Review: The True Cost


The True Cost is a documentary written and directed by Andrew Morgan, which explores the impact of "fast fashion" on people and the planet. This timely documentary latches onto the fashion industry, another example of how big business is driving profits at the cost of social and environmental responsibility.

Juxtaposing the consumer materialism and capitalist mindset against the reality of sweatshops in developing countries, we explore many facets of this tension as Morgan gives us a behind-the-scenes tour. From poor working conditions, human rights issues and textile factory disasters to industrialised cotton farming, we are led on an eye-opening and heartbreaking journey, which acquaints us with advocates driving change as well as the affected garment workers.

Morgan's message creates awareness about a justifiable concern and it's done with Michael Moore panache, adopting a biased standpoint and powering it home with great emotion. To his credit, he mostly succeeds in exposing the disturbing chain of exploitation and linking it back to major fashion brands and agricultural monopolies. While consumer materialism and capitalist profiteering are demonised, there's enough substance to his argument to provoke the right kind of conversations.

Companies seeking to increase profits are outsourcing their production to developing nations, where it is easier to take advantage of cheap labour and lax labour practices. While offering an alternative income to these impoverished nations seems like a helping hand, it's easier to wash one's hands when you can hide behind outdated regulations and other mitigating socio-economic factors.

The True Cost film

"Why me?"

Travelling between Bangladesh, Haiti, Japan, Cambodia, England and America, Morgan gets first-hand accounts from those directly affected and footage of factory floors to pollution concerns. The documentary is slick, moving fluidly from runways to sweatshops, and from advertising to talking heads. Since roughly 85% of the factory workers tend to be women, there's also a fascinating feminist undercurrent.

The stark contrasts between first and third world creates a palpable tension between the haves and have-nots. While "fast fashion" bigwigs are criticised for their business strategies and lack of ethics, it's a pity that Morgan was unable to secure an interview with any of their representatives. You can understand why they wouldn't want to be subjected to this kind of scrutiny, but it does make the documentary seem a bit one-sided, even if the outcome seems like a foregone conclusion.

The True Cost is a depressing indictment on big business, which is geared towards profit at the expense of human dignity, as long as it's not happening in their backyard. While reverse engineering the system would definitely lead to major improvements, what's even more saddening is that the governments of these developing countries seem to view their own people with equal disdain.

Morgan's objective for the documentary is to educate viewers to see the fashion industry's exploits and make wiser decisions in much the same way as he experienced it. Featuring fair trade companies demonstrates that there are alternatives and he suggests that by getting the customer to start questioning their spending habits, our collective self-awareness will lead to real change as a spotlight forces business to adjust their policies.

The True Cost captures some truly heartbreaking moments in interviews with subjects and even in the passion of some of the most hardened campaigners. This realness is at the heart of the documentary, which seeks to personalise the lowly garment maker who is making the greatest sacrifice in the clothing cycle. While you can't help but feel guilty for any threads you happen to be wearing, this message needs to be heard so that at the very least you will think about the costs beyond the pricetag.

The bottom line: Eye-opening


 
Spling's Galileo Pick of the Week: The Shawshank Redemption


Spling's Pick of the Week - The Shawshank Redemption at Castle Of Good Hope

THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION @ CASTLE OF GOOD HOPE (3 Mar)

Many will be surprised to learn that The Shawshank Redemption is based on a short story from Stephen King, the master of horror. Having authored The Green Mile, another acclaimed crime drama among many horrors, it seems he has a knack for ideas that make great films. Tim Robbins and Morgan Freeman immortalised themselves in this deeply affecting prison drama about two men who build a friendship on common decency over many years. What's special about The Shawshank Redemption is that it doesn't rely on gimmicks or effects, conveying its story through powerful visuals, strong dramatic themes and solid performances, which link together to transcend the celluloid and touch the soul. It's an absolute rarity for films to do this, which is probably why it deserves a place in hearts of those that see it. Screening this brilliant drama at the Castle of Good Hope will certainly add another dimension to this timeless film.

This monumental coming-of-age drama is showing under the stars at The Galileo Open Air Cinema.

BOOK TICKETS

 
Talking Movies with Spling - Tess, Hidden Figures and The 9th Life of Louis Drax


Spling reviews Tess, Hidden Figures and The 9th Life of Louis Drax as broadcast on Talking Movies, Fine Music Radio. Catch Talking Movies on Fridays at 8:20am and Saturdays at 8:15am every week on Fine Music Radio.

 
Movie Review: The Great Wall


The Great Wall of China is a defensive structure spanning 8850 km along the historical northern borders of China. While it was thought to be visible from the moon, the theory has been debunked several times and at best, it's visible from a low Earth orbit. The Great Wall movie takes advantage of some of the mythology surrounding the wall, its origins and its primary use as a defensive line against invading hordes. Part war epic and part action fantasy, The Great Wall introduces us to the idea that the hostile forces were in fact monsters, re-emerging to launch a full-scale siege every 60 years. We follow two European mercenaries in search of the legendary "black powder" (gunpowder), who find themselves at the mercy of a secret order of Chinese soldiers, who have made it their life's work to prepare for this attack.

Directed by Yimou Zhang whose filmography includes: Hero, The Curse of the Golden Flower, House of Flying Daggers and more recently The Flowers of War, expectations were understandably high. Zhang's body of work is impressive and substantial, despite encountering some tonal imbalances. In The Great Wall, a co-production, he finds himself walking the line between what attracts Chinese and American audiences. While it doesn't have the finesse of his earlier works, it still shows great flair and promise, as if he was adapting a graphic novel.

While The Great Wall received criticism around the nature of the casting with calls of "white saviour", Matt Damon's star quality and grounded history of performances is essential to pinning down this tale. He's supported by the likes of the crooked Willem Dafoe, noble Andy Lau, indomitable Tian Jing and humourous Pedro Pascal as his sidekick, Tovar.

"Hello wall."

The dazzling visuals, flag-waving call-to-arms and pageantry recall films like Ran and The Curse of the Golden Flower. We are immersed in a spectacular scenario as history and fantasy enmesh to create a beautiful tapestry, recalling the Ming dynasty's altruistic fortitude and reimagining battles with flair and imagination.

Matt Damon may seem slightly out of place, but so did Kevin Costner's American accent in Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves. A gifted archer and "prince of thieves", accompanied by a trusted warrior, there's a definite synergy between the films in terms of entertainment value and pulp fiction. While the action adventure of Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves was more grounded and gritty, both films have a comic twinkle with machismo and one-liners at the ready.

The Great Wall also has many affinities with science fiction action adventure, Starship Troopers, starring Casper von Dien. The epic tour of duty, battles against monstrous creatures, handsome cast, video game simplicity, unflappable lead and die hard camaraderie make them comparable, despite being worlds apart.

Perhaps a better contrast would be The Mummy, a mythological and historical action adventure that also straddles the real and unreal in an enjoyable and entertaining fashion. While steeped in ancient culture, it manages to leverage monuments to spin a tale of romance and high adventure on the back of pure popcorn entertainment.

While comparable with a number of rousing, entertaining and enjoyable popcorn films, The Great Wall doesn't quite have the spirit, substance or CGI to rank amongst them. Matt Damon's solemn performance isn't anything special, the video game plotting makes it all about the action and style, and while you're able to roll with it, the design and execution of the monsters is a bit clunky.

Still, while thinly scripted and bordering on ridiculous, the relentless action, spectacular visuals, ambitious mash-up and quality of the ensemble are good enough to keep you constantly amused. It's not a good film, but a surprisingly enjoyable one, which is made even easier on the ear and eye by 3D IMAX.

The bottom line: Fun

 
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